St Peter’s Basin: Postcode NE6 1TT

Where is it? Bing map|| Geograph grid ref NZ2763 || Neighbourhood summary 

St Peter's Basin (Feb 2014)
St Peter’s Basin (Feb 2014)

St Peter’s Basin is a private enterprise inner-city marina development of the 1980s. It is in the Byker ward of the city and is very much an upmarket residential enclave in a previously entirely working-class area of the city.

The approach road to St Peter’s Basin reflects the industrial origins of this riverside area, with a mixture of manufacturing and warehouse land-use still very much evident. In 1898 the OS map shows the area had brick works, saw mills and landing stages and these sorts of activities were still evident in the 1944 edition.  Most would still classify this as an inner-city area in transition from its industrial origins.

St Peter's marina and flats (Feb 2014)
St Peter’s marina and flats (Feb 2014)

The Riverside

The St Peter’s location is attractive to home buyers because of the river and the potential for water-based leisure pursuits. Many residents have their own mooring in the basin and jet skiing has become popular on the River Tyne.  Most of the flats and houses are owner-occupied or privately rented.

The development incorporated some offices and a pub with a restaurant, but it is fair to say relatively few community amenities were ever planned and there is little to meet the needs of young families or the elderly. The nearest shops and schools are in Byker, but it is likely these residents go into the city centre or drive further afield.

The Ouseburn Valley is between St Peter’s Basin and the centre of Newcastle Upon Tyne. It is home to media and public relations companies, art galleries, pubs and music venues. St Peter’s is also fairly close to university campuses and the city centre itself. This makes the area popular with young professional people.  Rents are within the reach of students sharing a flat (multiple occupation).

Marina office on the bank of the Tyne
Marina office on the bank of the Tyne (2002).

The Quayside

The Quayside was originally the focus of trade with warehouses and docks meeting the needs of the traffic on the river over several centuries.  As shipping and traditional industries declined in the city area and ships grew larger, the need for these functions evolved and moved to the deeper water at the mouth of the river.

The Tyne Flour Mill, the River Tyne and the Quayside, Newcastle Upon Tyne, 1938.
The Tyne Flour Mill, the River Tyne and the Quayside, Newcastle Upon Tyne, 1938.

New residential developments can be found on both banks of the River Tyne. City dwellers seem to be prepared to pay for a view of the river, particularly if it takes in one or more of the Tyne’s landmark bridges. These developments are part of a long term strategy to make the Quayside a core area in the region’s economy once again.  The relocation of the law courts to the Newcastle side of the river encouraged offices and other businesses to relocate alongside. The Quayside around the bridges is a vibrant upmarket area of pubs, clubs and restaurants. As the location of the Baltic gallery and the Sage music centre on the Gateshead side of the river, it is a cultural focus too.

flats_quay
Flats on the Quayside – the triangular building top right is part of the Byker Wall development (May 2014)
Traditional buildings on the Quayside (Feb 2014)
Traditional buildings on the Quayside (Feb 2014)
Looking across the Tyne to the Baltic, Gateshead (Feb 2014)
Looking across the Tyne to the Baltic, Gateshead (Feb 2014)
Flats on Newcastle Quayside (May 2014)
Flats on Newcastle Quayside (May 2014)

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